Matt Lara

Personal
  • Retreat

    "You have to go to Burning Man.”
    Words I’m a little too familiar with. I remember about 10 years ago I was working as a dancer in a corporate entertainment company. We were in a limo en route to a gig on Long Island (or lord knows where) and one of my castmates kept going on and on about her week at Burning Man. I was intrigued. It sounded really cool to go out to the desert in the middle of nowhere and do nothing but make art and be creative all day. I never made it there, though. Time passed and along came social media which pretty much ruins anything trendy. Nowadays I might roll an eye or two if anyone even mentions their "Burn.”
    To be clear, I actually don’t have any hate for Burning Man. Perhaps a little FOMO about it, but that’s really it.
    I get that us creative folks need a retreat of some sort. A space to disappear for awhile. Some people really do need that week in the desert. People save up for the entire year to go pretend they don’t live their mundane, day-to-day lives. Me, I need a week in the mountains every year teaching at Camp Bravo. I’m lucky to have been able to go there since I was 14.
    Then there's this thing with social media that makes us to want to go to these places and post about how authentic we are. How we’re having such a great time while we take selfies.
    Again, I don’t hate that. But it’s not what I’m necessarily for. Make that escape whenever you can. Take the week off. Go to the desert, the mountains. A tiny hotel room to go finish the novel. The point should be to come back home to the life you have now having felt enriched by the escape. Maybe you come to some realizations or decide to make a few changes. Maybe you just made some memories. The point is to eventually come home, not constantly escape.
    So really, I don’t have to go to Burning Man. Stop telling me I do.
  • My afternoon coffee.

    I paused for a moment to capture my afternoon coffee. Seems to be a basic Instagram subject. People seem to love pictures of coffee. It’s a lovely, temperate Spring here in Southern California and the warm coffee on a slow afternoon was a comfort to me. Nothing profound, just comforting. The afternoon light made it better.

    As I navigate out of the plights of my last few years—my family loss, and figuring out what steps to take next—these moments are worth taking the time for. Thankfully, I am armed with a few good cameras to see me through.

    Matt

  • A Verdant Spring to Lift My Spirits

    As much as I want to be the go-getter type, I realize that this moment in my life is not about achievements or getting things done. Coming out of a big family tragedy like I have means my day consists of getting up, doing the work I need to get done for the day, and making sure I'm keeping a slower pace. I'm lucky to have the space to do so.

    The green all around me has inspired me. A few weeks of steady rain in Southern California (a brief, but necessary winter around these parts) have transformed a normally dry landscape into a verdant one. I'm old enough to remember when Spring actually felt like Spring around here. So to see it brings me such joy.

    A few images...

    A walk with Wally.

    The lovely California Poppy. These flowers actually close up in the evening time.

    A quick Sunday trip to the local farmer's market.

    Friends in the city ask me "where have you been?" and my answer is that I've been here. As much as I want to run from all that has been going on in my life, I actually run to these images. This much green has given me so much renewal.

    -Matt

  • Uplifting Spring Colors

    I've been going through a major shift after dealing a with a big family loss after the start of the new year. My family and I have been dealing with it fairly well, though we were in a battle with cancer for a good year and a half. We were rather worn out. Much of our community has come out to lift us up, even bringing flowers. I never was a big flower person. Sure, they are pretty and I like photographing them up close for a Georgia O'keefe moment, but I was never sure why people brought flowers when someone passes away.

    Now I do. Their bright, wonderful colors are so incredibly uplifting and inspiring to a visual person like myself. I have been spending time picking up the pieces after this family tragedy, and these blooms have been a big help in that process. Coming out of a fairly dark winter for Southern California, noticing more color in the Spring is also giving me new life from within.

    My longtime friend, full time mom, and fellow photographer, Punam Bean, invited me to my first ever Holi celebration at her home in Atwater Village. Part of the Holi festivities is throwing colored powder all over the place as a celebration of Spring beginning. Holidays like this are all over social media these days, but like I've mentioned before I tend to get a little uncomfortable appropriating a tradition that I never grew up with. The beauty of this day was that Punam made it a cultural education experience for the children and guests as part of her homeschooling program. It was an invitation to participate and not just snap photos.

    Winter light in California can be intriquing in it's own way, but once the days got a little longer and more light lingered in the evenings, I found myself enjoying smaller moments around the house.

    Feeling such inspiration from Spring colors was a bit unexpected for me, but I'll take it as a sign of brighter days to come.

    Matt

    Insta: @mattlara

    Twitter: @mattlara_

    My photography: www.MattLaraPhotography.com